Camping Gaz Turbo 270 Conversion for Threaded Fuel Canisters



Camping Gaz Bleuet 206 (left) and Bleuet 270 Micro (right)


Camping Gaz Bleuet 206 was my first backpacking stove (mid 80's). It ran on a pierceable butane and propane mixed cartridge, which at the time was available worldwide. The 206 was super easy to use and each cartridge provided 6 hours of cooking time. Just turn the knob and light. There were only two downsides to the stove. Once you pierced the c206 190-gram canister you could not remove the stove until all the fuel was used. Also, the butane and propane mixed canister would freeze in cold weather. I never had an issue with the fuel freezing. 

As a kid each year at Christmas, I would receive one or two new canisters of fuel in my stocking. Anytime I found the canisters on sale I would purchase the 3-4 of them at a time to stock up my supply. I still have a good stockpile of c206 190 gram canisters. 

Years later I purchased Camping Gaz Bleuet 270 Micro Stove which used a sealable CV270 220-gram or CV470 450-gram canisters. This stove was also super easy to use just like the Bleuet 206. But now I could take the stove off from the fuel canister for easier packing. Still had the same freezing issue with this stove as the Bleuet 206. Another disadvantage to this stove was you could only use the Camping Gaz canister with this stove. All other stove manufacturers use a threaded connector canister.


Camping Gaz Non-threaded (left) and the Coleman (right) is threaded like most modern canisters

Just within a year or two the purchase of this second stove. Coleman purchased the French company and sometime around 2016 the canisters were no longer distributed in the United States.    



My second stove the Camping Gaz Bleuet 270 Micro Stove on the self-sealing canister




Once the stock of canisters in the stores was gone that was it for US consumers. Once people used up their stockpile of fuel canisters their stoves became paperweights. Over the years I have not used my Bleuet 206 much and have many years of fuel canisters still left. Both the Bleuet 206 and the Bleuet 270 have been very dependable stoves for me and I hate to have to give them up for the fact that the fuel canisters cannot be sourced here in the United States but can be found readily available in other parts of the world.

Every few years I would check online to see if the canisters could be sourced without any luck. But then I saw that folks were doing conversions to be able to use the threaded fuel canisters. Great! It looked like my Bleuet 270 might be used again. But this ended up not being the case. But I wanted to know how this was done and it would be cool to use a Camping Gaz stove again.

With all the new modern-day stoves that just weight a few grams why go through the time, money just to get an old stove up and running. Well, that's a fair question and one that I hope I can answer. The Camping Gaz model stoves that I have were dependable and very easy to use. I was able to do more than just boil water for my backpacking meals. I was able to cook real meals while camping. If you think about it. Most great outdoor adventures had a great meal with friends to go with it. I would also say that it doesn't sit well with me that the fuel canisters cannot be sourced here in the United States but can be elsewhere. 

If you have been a fan of Camping Gaz stoves or just like to read about how to make conversions, modifications or hack just stick with me while I show you the process. The Bleuet 270 which looks like it would work will not! I needed to start with the Camping Gaz Turbo 270.     



Camping Gaz Turbo 270 carrying case
I was able to source a Camping Gaz Turbo 270 stove online. I had no idea how old the stove was, how much it was used or when it was used last.  


All the parts that make up the Turbo 270

There are a couple of differences between the Bleuet 270 and the Turbo 270 stoves. The most noticeable is the burner on the Turbo 270 is bigger. Also, the housing part that the on/off knob is attached to is different. 


Next, I needed a donor stove for the valve that is needed for this conversion.  The Coleman Peak 1 (3001 series) stove is what I am going to use. The stove can be easily found and runs under $20.



Coleman Peak 1 is needed as a donor

The Coleman Peak 1 right out the box. I was a little taken back at the overall quality of this stove.  


Coleman Peak 1 out of the box


Step #1: Remove the red plastic housing.

One side of the plastic housing off. 

Step #2: Once the housing is off removed all other parts of the stove. What's that blue that I see?

All the parts of the stove
Step#3: Remove black dummy cap from the blue turn Knob

Guess what? That is a Camping Gaz valve





How about that! Surprised to see the Camping Gaz blue Knob? That is the same style knob that is on my Bleuet 270 and the same knob that is on the Turbo 270. 


Step #4: Unscrew the Turbo 270 burner head from the valve and replace it with the new one from the donor stove.

Turbo 270 with the new valve




Turbo 270 attached to a new threaded fuel canister




Step #5: Turn the knob on and light. Note: I have the solid section of the windscreen in the back of the stove. That section should be over the knob. 



There you go! I was able to take the stove that used non-threaded fuel canisters and convert it over to use threaded fuel canisters. I am sure this stove sat in someone's garage or gear closet for years. The stove fired up like it was used on a backpacking or canoeing trip last week. Just goes to show you how dependable of a canister stove the Turbo 270 is. 

  








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